Baltimore and the Great War (World War I)
Wayne Schaumburg

November 25, Sunday, 3 pm

Join Baltimore historian and educator Wayne R. Schaumburg for an illustrated program on Baltimore’s role in World War I.

The talk will focus on a number of different aspects of the conflict including the men and women who served in military and civilian positions.

Baltimore war industries from the manufacturing of cotton duck in Hampden to the shipyards pf Bethlehem Steel played a major part in the war effort.

Johns Hopkins Hospital would establish the first medical treatment center in France.

Four present-day military installations began during the war: Camp Meade, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Edgewood Arsenal, and Camp Holabird.

We will also take a look at some of the local heroes of the conflict as well as monuments and memorials to “The Great War” that can be found all around Baltimore.

Wayne Schaumburg
Born and raised in the Waverly section of Baltimore, Wayne R. Schaumburg graduated from Baltimore City College in 1964. He attended Towson University where he majored in both history and geography. Wayne also has a Masters Degree in history from Morgan State University, and a Masters of Liberal Arts Degree from Johns Hopkins University.

He taught social studies in the city school system for 39 years before retiring in June, 2007. Currently, Wayne teaches courses on Baltimore history part-time for Towson University, Notre Dame of Maryland University, Johns Hopkins University, Community College of Baltimore County, and the Roland Park Country School. He also maintains a web site on events relating to the city’s history (http://www.waynesguidetobaltimore.com).

Wayne has been giving tours and illustrated lectures on Baltimore history for over 35 years covering a variety of topics from architecture to the Great Baltimore Fire. For the last 33 years, he has led walking tours through one of his favorite Baltimore landmarks: Green Mount Cemetery. His hobbies include collecting old postcards and photos of Baltimore as well as an on-going interest in the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904.

At the present time, Wayne lives in Perry Hall and serves on the boards of Baltimore Heritage, the Friends of Perry Hall Mansion, the Clifton Mansion Salon, and the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House. His son Tim is a graduate of both Goucher College and Loyola University of Maryland. He teaches for the Baltimore County school system. Wayne’s daughter Jennifer is a graduate of St. Mary’s College of Maryland and the University of Swansea in Wales. She currently works for a medical service company in Pennsylvania.


GUESTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT OUR MEETINGS.

WEATHER RELATED CLOSINGS → WBAL AM 1090 RADIO / VISIT THE BCGS HOME PAGE.

For detailed directions and a map, select → PLANNING A VISIT.


THE FOLLOWING TAKES PLACE ON MEETING DATES:

  • The LIBRARY is open from 12 – 2 pm.
  • The GENERAL MEETING followed by refreshments takes place from 2 – 3 pm.
  • THE GUEST SPEAKER PRESENTS FROM 3 – 4 pm.

 

INTEREST GROUPS MEET IN THE CORRIDOR OUTSIDE OF THE LIBRARY:


 

P R O G R A M   O F   S P E A K E R S
2 0 1 8   –   F A L L

Baltimore’s Great Wave of Immigration
Nick Fessenden

SEPTEMBER 23, Sunday, 3 pm

It is a little known fact that during the Great Wave of Immigration from 1830 to 1914, 1.5 million immigrants landed in Baltimore, America’s third largest port of entry.

Nicholas will describe the stories of the major groups who came to Baltimore, Germans, Irish, and Jews, as well as Poles, Lithuanians, Czechs, and Italians.

He will discuss why the immigrants left their homelands, how they crossed the Ocean, and how they fashioned new lives in their adopted country.

Syllabus (PDF)→ GREAT WAVE

Nicholas Fessenden
Nicholas Fessenden earned a B.A. in History at Yale, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in 1972 from Columbia University, also in History. He taught History in the Upper School at Friends School of Baltimore (1972-2010), as well as History at Maryland Institute of Art (1981-2000) as an adjunct. Since retirement in 2010, he has taught at CCBC/Owings Mills and at the Osher Institute at Towson University. He serves on the board of the Baltimore Immigration Memorial, which opened a museum in Locust Point two years ago, chronicling Baltimore’s immigration’s history. We at the museum have welcomed visitors from the public at large, as well as from schools, colleges, retirement communities, and genealogical societies.

 


Maps & Land Records
Mike Pierce

OCTOBER 28, Sunday, 3 pm

The talk will cover the use of maps and land records to help identify ancestors, and to fill in interesting details about their lives.

Depending on the desires of those in attendance, it can get into Baltimore genealogy records that are available online.

The focus will be on the information that Mike has included on his website, map-maker.org.

Mike Pierce:
Mike has always been interested in both maps and family history and has lived in the Baltimore area for the past 23 years. Following a career in telecommunications, he is now able to spend full time on these hobbies and sharing the results with others. One big project was mapping all of the early Baltimore County land grants.



Baltimore and the Great War (World War I)
Wayne Schaumburg

November 25, Sunday, 3 pm

Join Baltimore historian and educator Wayne R. Schaumburg for an illustrated program on Baltimore’s role in World War I.

The talk will focus on a number of different aspects of the conflict including the men and women who served in military and civilian positions.

Baltimore war industries from the manufacturing of cotton duck in Hampden to the shipyards pf Bethlehem Steel played a major part in the war effort.

Johns Hopkins Hospital would establish the first medical treatment center in France.

Four present-day military installations began during the war: Camp Meade, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Edgewood Arsenal, and Camp Holabird.

We will also take a look at some of the local heroes of the conflict as well as monuments and memorials to “The Great War” that can be found all around Baltimore.

Wayne Schaumburg
Born and raised in the Waverly section of Baltimore, Wayne R. Schaumburg graduated from Baltimore City College in 1964. He attended Towson University where he majored in both history and geography. Wayne also has a Masters Degree in history from Morgan State University, and a Masters of Liberal Arts Degree from Johns Hopkins University.

He taught social studies in the city school system for 39 years before retiring in June, 2007. Currently, Wayne teaches courses on Baltimore history part-time for Towson University, Notre Dame of Maryland University, Johns Hopkins University, Community College of Baltimore County, and the Roland Park Country School. He also maintains a web site on events relating to the city’s history (http://www.waynesguidetobaltimore.com).

Wayne has been giving tours and illustrated lectures on Baltimore history for over 35 years covering a variety of topics from architecture to the Great Baltimore Fire. For the last 33 years, he has led walking tours through one of his favorite Baltimore landmarks: Green Mount Cemetery. His hobbies include collecting old postcards and photos of Baltimore as well as an on-going interest in the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904.

At the present time, Wayne lives in Perry Hall and serves on the boards of Baltimore Heritage, the Friends of Perry Hall Mansion, the Clifton Mansion Salon, and the Star-Spangled Banner Flag House. His son Tim is a graduate of both Goucher College and Loyola University of Maryland. He teaches for the Baltimore County school system. Wayne’s daughter Jennifer is a graduate of St. Mary’s College of Maryland and the University of Swansea in Wales. She currently works for a medical service company in Pennsylvania.

 

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(The image next to “Research Day” courtesy of http://www.vintagekin.com/)