Baltimore’s Great Wave of Immigration
Nick Fessenden

SEPTEMBER 23, Sunday, 3 pm

It is a little known fact that during the Great Wave of Immigration from 1830 to 1914, 1.5 million immigrants landed in Baltimore, America’s third largest port of entry.

Nicholas will describe the stories of the major groups who came to Baltimore, Germans, Irish, and Jews, as well as Poles, Lithuanians, Czechs, and Italians.

He will discuss why the immigrants left their homelands, how they crossed the Ocean, and how they fashioned new lives in their adopted country.

Syllabus in PDF format→ GREAT WAVE

Nicholas Fessenden
Nicholas Fessenden earned a B.A. in History at Yale, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in 1972 from Columbia University, also in History. He taught History in the Upper School at Friends School of Baltimore (1972-2010), as well as History at Maryland Institute of Art (1981-2000) as an adjunct. Since retirement in 2010, he has taught at CCBC/Owings Mills and at the Osher Institute at Towson University. He serves on the board of the Baltimore Immigration Memorial, which opened a museum in Locust Point two years ago, chronicling Baltimore’s immigration’s history. We at the museum have welcomed visitors from the public at large, as well as from schools, colleges, retirement communities, and genealogical societies.


GUESTS ARE ALWAYS WELCOME AT OUR MEETINGS.

WEATHER RELATED CLOSINGS → WBAL AM 1090 RADIO / VISIT THE BCGS HOME PAGE.

For detailed directions and a map, select → PLANNING A VISIT.


THE FOLLOWING TAKES PLACE ON MEETING DATES:

  • The LIBRARY is open from 12 – 2 pm.
  • The GENERAL MEETING followed by refreshments takes place from 2 – 3 pm.
  • THE GUEST SPEAKER PRESENTS FROM 3 – 4 pm.

 

INTEREST GROUPS MEET IN THE CORRIDOR OUTSIDE OF THE LIBRARY:


 

P R O G R A M   O F   S P E A K E R S
2 0 1 8   –   F A L L

Baltimore’s Great Wave of Immigration
Nick Fessenden

SEPTEMBER 23, Sunday, 3 pm

It is a little known fact that during the Great Wave of Immigration from 1830 to 1914, 1.5 million immigrants landed in Baltimore, America’s third largest port of entry.

Nicholas will describe the stories of the major groups who came to Baltimore, Germans, Irish, and Jews, as well as Poles, Lithuanians, Czechs, and Italians.

He will discuss why the immigrants left their homelands, how they crossed the Ocean, and how they fashioned new lives in their adopted country.

Syllabus (PDF)→ GREAT WAVE

Nicholas Fessenden
Nicholas Fessenden earned a B.A. in History at Yale, and an M.A. and Ph.D. in 1972 from Columbia University, also in History. He taught History in the Upper School at Friends School of Baltimore (1972-2010), as well as History at Maryland Institute of Art (1981-2000) as an adjunct. Since retirement in 2010, he has taught at CCBC/Owings Mills and at the Osher Institute at Towson University. He serves on the board of the Baltimore Immigration Memorial, which opened a museum in Locust Point two years ago, chronicling Baltimore’s immigration’s history. We at the museum have welcomed visitors from the public at large, as well as from schools, colleges, retirement communities, and genealogical societies.

 


Maps & Land Records
Mike Pierce

OCTOBER 28, Sunday, 3 pm

The talk will cover the use of maps and land records to help identify ancestors, and to fill in interesting details about their lives.

Depending on the desires of those in attendance, it can get into Baltimore genealogy records that are available online.

The focus will be on the information that Mike has included on his website, map-maker.org.

Mike Pierce:
Mike has always been interested in both maps and family history and has lived in the Baltimore area for the past 23 years. Following a career in telecommunications, he is now able to spend full time on these hobbies and sharing the results with others. One big project was mapping all of the early Baltimore County land grants.


TBA

NOVEMBER 25, Sunday, 3 pm

 

* * * VIEW THE ARCHIVE OF PAST SPEAKERS * * *

(The image next to “Research Day” courtesy of http://www.vintagekin.com/)